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Brief History of Claveria


Most of the founding fathers of Claveria came from the general directions of Pasuquin and Vintar, both towns of the province of Ilocos Norte, more than a century ago. Driven by their daring tenacity and courage to search for better life and greener pastures, they blazed their trail northeastward crossing the Caraballo Mountain Ranges, popularly known later as Calvario because of the dangers of its winding, precipitous and muddy roads.

When they reached a vast area of forest beside a river, which was teeming with fish, and plenty of lilies called bakung, they decided to clear the area and developed it into a settlement. They called their place Kabakungan meaning where the bakungs are. The name later evolved into Kabikungan.

The settlers were engaged mostly in fishing. So there was a move to transfer the settlement near the seashore. But the Spanish missionaries protested because of the church that was constructed as the center of their faith.

The marauding pirates called tirong from the south seas raided the settlement. They plundered the place, burned some dwellings and destroyed the church, which later was ruined by strong earthquakes and inequities of time and weather. The site of the church was then called Nagsimbaanan, now called Pontoon.

The event paved the way to the transfer of the settlement.

The Spanish Governor General Narciso Claveria initiated a vigorous campaign against the marauding pirates. He was conferred the Grand Cross of San Fernando by the Queen of Spain for his success that sounded the death-knell of the outlaws in 1848.

Governor General Claveria visited Kabikungan during a fiesta of thanksgiving. He docked his ship beside the river. The residents presented their petition that the settlement become a separate town.

Kabikungan then was a part of Pamplona, a town 40 kilometers away.

It was in June 5, 1865 that Kabikungan finally became a town. As a gratitude to their benefactor from the marauding pirates, the town was named Claveria in honor of the Spanish Governor General Narciso Claveria.

Last Updated on Saturday, 28 March 2009 11:18